Tuesday Trivia – December 11, 2018

Happy Tuesday! The final question for 2018 focuses on the EPA 500 Series methods that have been developed to quantify organic contaminants in drinking water. For those unfamiliar, EPA Method 525.2 outlines the extraction and quantification of organic compounds in drinking water. The EPA eventually revised the method and released Method 525.3. The updated revision incorporates a number of changes to improve the extraction and quantification of drinking water contaminants. Continue reading Tuesday Trivia – December 11, 2018

Tuesday Trivia – Answer for November 13, 2018

Just a reminder of last week’s post:

The United States has been using pesticides for decades to protect crops and livestock from disease, mold, insect damage and many other types of pesky organisms. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), roughly 540 million pounds of pesticides were used in 1964. How many pounds of pesticides were being used across the nation by 1993?

Answer: 1.1 billion

Technically, the term “pesticide” is a somewhat generic term to describe a substance that controls pests. Based on that definition, pesticides include herbicides, fungicides, insecticides and many more chemical solutions. Given the increase in the U.S. population between 1964 and 1993, and the growth in the number of viruses, fungi, bacteria and other organisms that could endanger the health of our crops and livestock, it’s not surprising that our use of pesticides rose significantly over that period of time.

Join us next week to Expand Your Horizon!

Tuesday Trivia – October 30, 2018

On the eve of Halloween, I find myself reminiscing about how I celebrated the holiday as a child. I remember the excitement of getting dressed up as my favorite animal or TV character, and bringing home a sack full of candy after a successful night of trick or treating. I also remember doing fun activities like making glow in the dark slime or ghost rockets.

Continue reading Tuesday Trivia – October 30, 2018

Tuesday Trivia – Answer for October 16, 2018

During National Chemistry Week, we’re continuing our trivia with an “Out of this World” focus.

Just a reminder of last week’s post:

An interesting study at the University of Georgia revealed the major component of interstellar clouds to be:

(a) Hydrogen and helium atoms
(b) Mothballs
(c) My dreams
(d) Ammonia
(e) Carbon Monoxide

Answer: mothballs

A handful of researchers measured infrared emission from some interstellar clouds and found a measurable concentration of gas-phase naphthalene, which is the main compound in mothballs. Just to clarify, naphthalene is pretty flammable so modern day mothballs are primarily composed of 1,4-dichlorobenzene, but older mothballs contained lots of naphthalene.

It’s only the third day of National Chemistry Week so you have 4 more days to celebrate the fact that chemistry is out of this world!

Join us next week to Expand Your Horizon!

Tuesday Trivia – October 2, 2018

Happy Tuesday! This week’s question will focus on one of the EPA methods used for extracting semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) prior to analysis by GC/MS. Are you ready to Expand Your Horizon?

Continue reading Tuesday Trivia – October 2, 2018

Tuesday Trivia – Answer for September 18

It’s now 1 week past World Water Monitoring Day – tell us what you did to celebrate in the comments below:

For those who took last week’s quiz to measure their water quality knowledge, read on. The questions and answers are below:

Continue reading Tuesday Trivia – Answer for September 18

Tuesday Trivia – September 11, 2018

Happy Tuesday! This week’s question will focus on the EPA method for performing n-hexane extractions, otherwise known as “oil and grease” extractions. If you are ready to Expand Your Horizon, read on.

Today’s question: According to EPA Method 1664 A/B, n-hexane is used as an extraction solvent and must have a minimum purity level of…

(a) 80%
(b) 85%
(c) 95%
(d) 98%
(e) None of the above

Hazard a guess in the comments below! (need a hint? The answer isn’t “none of the above”)

Stay tuned next Tuesday….

Tuesday Trivia Answer – August 28, 2018

Just to recap last week’s Tuesday Trivia post: Due to rising levels of ______ (fill in the blank) ________, some species of fish are slowly losing their ability to smell.

Answer: Carbon dioxide (CO2)

As the levels of carbon dioxide rise in a body of water, carbon dioxide converts to carbonic acid which increases the acidity of the water. It turns out, acidic conditions reduce the sensitivity of the olfactory sensors in a fish (i.e. the nerves responsible for being able to smell).

As we’ve demonstrated with posts and trivia questions in the past, protecting, testing and treating our fresh water sources is important to the health of everyone. Read through this helpful infographic for a quick review of the potential contaminants that could find their way into our water sources.

Join us next week to Expand Your Horizon!

Tuesday Trivia – July 31, 2018 Answer

For those who saw last week’s Tuesday Trivia post, read on for the answer you’ve been waiting for.

For those who are unfamiliar with these posts, every other Tuesday, a trivia question will get posted to allow us to test our wits and expand our horizons.

As a reminder, the question that was posed last week:

Imagine shrinking the Earth’s water supply down to 100 liters. The volume of fresh, usable water would be roughly ____(fill in the blank)____ liters.

Answer:  0.003 liters!

This may seem like a surprising answer, given that water is everywhere on the Earth – glaciers, lakes, rivers, streams, oceans and aquifers.  There’s even moisture in the atmosphere!  However, you must first take into account that most of the water on Earth (roughly 97%) is contained within our oceans which makes it salt water, not fresh water.  A significant portion of the remaining fresh water is tied up in glaciers, too polluted for safe consumption, or is buried too deep under the Earth’s crust.  Obviously, we could make attempts to clean up our polluted waters or pull fresh water out of the Earth, but those quickly become cost-prohibitive options for the planet’s growing population.

Clearly, fresh water is a precious resource for us. Click here to learn more about methods for monitoring and protecting our water sources.

Stay tuned for a new trivia question next week. In the meantime, wrack your brain for your best trivia questions and send them to me in the comments section. We’re eager to expand our horizons!