How does your sample prep change for LC/MS vs GC/MS

When preparing your extracts for analysis, it is important to know which instrument to use and why you should be using that specific one.  Of course, we know that each EPA method dictates which analysis instrument must be used within each method, however, we will be determining why that option was chosen in the first place in this blog post! Continue reading How does your sample prep change for LC/MS vs GC/MS

Reusable vs single-use disk holders – Which is best-suited for your application?

Have you ever thought to yourself am I using the best solid phase extraction disk offering for my application? Or can our prep lab turn samples around more efficiently if we choose a different SPE disk platform such as a single-use disk holder instead of cleaning our reusable holders? Those are just a few questions I receive when working with sample prep solutions with customers when SPE disks are brought up in the conversion.

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Automating EPH Fractionation in the Lab

Anyone familiar with Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPH)  methods such as those developed by Massachusetts DEP, New Jersey DEP, or one of the other various state agencies that regulate EPHs is familiar with the long and grueling process of fractionation. These methods require you to split the initial sample extract into two distinct fractions, the aromatic and aliphatic portions, which allow you to better characterize hydrocarbons that may be affecting the environment (for more info read out previous blog post). It is most commonly achieved through a manual method which is driven by only gravity that can cause quite a bottleneck in the lab. This process can be particularly finicky requiring you to determine the exact volumes needed so that you do not elute one fraction’s compounds into the wrong fraction by mistake. On top of this, the traditional procedure involves the use of gravity to elute the fractions through a cartridge which requires a lot of hands-on time to ensure that the cartridge does not go dry and that it is moved at the correct time. All in all, this process can cause many a headache when it does not run smoothly.

Biotage Extrahera

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What does gas vortex shearing do in evaporation? Why should I care?

It is question and answer time and we are starting with TurboVap® evaporators and their use in an environmental lab.  The TurboVap® evaporation system by design utilizes a patented gas vortex shearing technology. You may be asking yourself, “what does that mean?” I know I did when I first heard about it!  Read on to learn more about what this does for your lab evaporation.

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Why are my phenol recoveries low on my EPA Method 8270/625.1 extractions?

Do you have issues seeing acceptable recovery of your phenols?  I know I do.  These compounds can be challenging to recover and quantitate, and are also found just about everywhere!  Read on to learn a couple of fun facts about phenols, but first, let’s explain why phenols can be difficult to work with.

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Common Mistakes in the Lab

When working in a contract lab or any analytical testing lab, you may be prone to periods where it seems like there is never going to be a light at the end of the tunnel, as the samples just keep on coming in. For me, I always dreaded when spring rolled around and the whole world thawed out because I knew samples would start coming in nonstop since everyone and their mother wanted to get their quarterly testing done. When faced with what seems to be such an insurmountable workload some of your normal good lab practices might take a hit if you are rushing to extract before a sample’s hold time expires. One such good lab practice is properly cleaning the glassware or anything else that might come in contact with your samples.

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Are Your Proficiency Testing Results Failing for EPA Method 1664 with SPE?

It is that time of year again when laboratories are fulfilling accreditation requirements for the methods that they offer. One of the requirements that must be met for each method is called proficiency testing (PT). If you are not familiar with proficiency testing, it is a sample purchased from an approved vendor to evaluate the ability of a lab to meet the acceptance criteria of the method.  If the labs’ results are out of the PT samples acceptance criteria, they can redo the testing.

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Biotage Horizon 5000 and FT-IR Detection – Expanded Detection Possibilities

IR technology is a rapid and convenient tool for both qualitative and quantitative analysis that has been around for over a century. Traditional IR spectroscopy relies on vibration energies from the molecular bindings, where IR emission is absorbed by the bond when it has the same frequency as the specific vibration or movement as the bond.

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Hydrophilic Solution for Your Vapor Lock Dilemma

Have you ever put your water sample onto your Biotage® Horizon 3100 extractor and all your prewet/conditioning steps worked great and then suddenly, the water inlet valve opens, and nothing happens!  This can be terrifying because a lot is riding on those samples!  If you notice this right when it happens, a simple wiggle of the sample bottle should introduce air into the bottle releasing the water, in turn loading your sample.  However, you do not want this happening all the time, especially when you leave your extractor for a while, come back, and see that your sample never loaded!

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Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPH) Fractionation and Bottlenecks in the Laboratory

Anyone familiar with EPH methods such as those developed by the Massachusetts or New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection is familiar with the long and gruelling process of fractionation. For those unfamiliar, with EPH or Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons it is an extraction that essentially occurs in two distinct parts: the initial extraction & concentration and then the fractionation of that initial extract into the aromatic and aliphatic fractions followed by concentration again.  EPH is a method that replaces the TPH (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons) or 8015 methods and allows for the calculation of specified carbon ranges giving you a more accurate assessment of potential health risks.

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